END IN SIGHT: US President Barack Obama appears with tears on his cheek during remarks at his final presidential campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, on Monday. Picture: REUTERS
END IN SIGHT: US President Barack Obama appears with tears on his cheek during remarks at his final presidential campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, on Monday. Picture: REUTERS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney face the verdict of US voters on Tuesday after a long and bitter White House campaign, with polls showing them deadlocked in a race that will be decided in a handful of states where it is extraordinarily close.

At least 120-million Americans are expected to vote on giving Mr Obama a second term or replacing him with Mr Romney. Their decision will set the country’s course for four years on spending, taxes, healthcare and foreign policy challenges such as the rise of China and Iran’s nuclear ambitions.

National opinion polls show Mr Obama and Mr Romney in a virtual dead heat, although the Democratic incumbent has a slight advantage in several vital swing states — most notably Ohio — that could give him the 270 electoral votes he needs to win.

Mr Romney, the multimillionaire former head of a private equity fund, would be the first Mormon president and one of the wealthiest Americans to occupy the White House. Mr Obama, the first black president, is vying to be the first Democrat to win a second term since Bill Clinton in 1996.

Fuelled by record spending on negative ads, the battle between the two men was focused primarily on the lagging economic recovery and persistent high unemployment, but at times it turned personal.

Polls will begin to close in Indiana and Kentucky at 11pm GMT on Tuesday, with voting ending across the country over the next six hours.

The first results, by tradition, were tallied in Dixville Notch and Hart’s Location, New Hampshire, shortly after 5am GMT. Mr Obama and Mr Romney each received five votes in Dixville Notch. In Hart’s Location, Mr Obama got 23 votes to nine votes for Mr Romney, with two votes cast for Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson.

The close presidential race raises fears of a disputed outcome similar to the 2000 election, which was decided by the US Supreme Court. Both campaigns have assembled legal teams to deal with possible voting problems, challenges or recounts.

The balance of power in the US Congress will also be at stake in Senate and House of Representatives races that could affect the outcome of "fiscal cliff" negotiations on spending cuts and tax increases, which kick in at the end of the year unless a deal is reached.

Mr Obama’s Democrats are now expected to narrowly hold their Senate majority, while Mr Romney’s Republicans are favoured to retain House control.

Despite the weak economy, Mr Obama appeared in September to be cruising to a relatively easy win after a strong party convention and a series of stumbles by Mr Romney, including a secretly recorded video showing the Republican writing off 47% of the electorate as government-dependent victims.

But Mr Romney rebounded in the first debate on October 3 in Denver, where his sure-footed criticism of the president and Mr Obama’s listless response started a slow rise for Mr Romney in polls. Mr Obama seemed to regain his footing in recent days at the head of federal relief efforts for victims of the storm Sandy.

The presidential contest is now likely to be determined by voter turnout — specifically, what combination of Republicans, Democrats, white, minority, young, old and independent voters shows up at polling stations.

‘We know what change looks like’

Mr Obama and Mr Romney raced through seven battleground states on the final day of campaigning to hammer home their final themes, urge supporters to get to the polls and woo the last remaining undecided voters.

Mr Obama focused on Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa, the three Midwestern swing states that, barring surprises elsewhere, would give him 270 electoral votes. Mr Romney visited the must-win states of Florida, Virginia and Ohio before finishing in New Hampshire, where he launched his presidential run in June 2011.

After two days of nearly round-the-clock travel, Mr Obama wrapped up his final campaign tour in Des Moines, Iowa, with a speech that hearkened back to his 2008 campaign.

"I’ve come back to Iowa one more time to ask for your vote. I came back to ask you to help us finish what we’ve started, because this is where our movement for change began," he told a crowd of about 20,000 people.

Mr Obama’s voice broke and he wiped away tears from his eyes as he reflected on those who had helped his campaign.

Mr Romney’s final day included stops in Florida, Virginia, Ohio and New Hampshire. The former governor of Massachusetts ended the day at a raucous "Final Victory" rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, the city where he launched his campaign last year.

"We’re one day away from a fresh start. We’re one day away from a new beginning," the candidate, sounding hoarse at his fifth rally of the day, told the crowd of 12,000 at a sports arena in t