BAUCHI — Gunmen kidnapped seven foreigners and killed a security guard when they stormed the compound of Lebanese construction company Setraco in northern Nigeria’s Bauchi state early on Sunday, police said.

Among those abducted were a Briton, an Italian, a Greek and four Lebanese workers, including two women, local government chairman Adamu Aliyu and security sources said.

It was the worst case of foreigners being kidnapped in the mostly-Muslim north of Africa’s most populous country since an insurgency by Islamist militants intensified nearly two years ago.

No one took responsibility for the raid but northern Nigeria is plagued by attacks and kidnappings by Islamist groups. Al-Qaeda-aligned group Ansaru, which rose to prominence only in recent months, claimed the kidnap in December of a French national who is still missing.

Bauchi police chief Mohammed Ladan said the gunmen attacked a police station and a prison overnight before storming the construction firm’s compound in the town of Jama’are.

"We repelled the attack on the police station and the security men at the prison yard also repelled the attack, but they burnt two vehicles in Jama’are police station," Mr Ladan said.

"They then attacked Setraco construction, killed a local security guard and they succeeded in kidnapping people." The Italian and Greek foreign ministries confirmed that one of their nationals was taken in the raid. A spokesman for the British Embassy in Abuja said it was investigating.

Islamists

Islamist group Ansaru’s full name is Jama’atu Ansarul Musilimina Fi Biladis Sudan, which roughly translates as "Vanguards for the Protection of Muslims in Black Africa".

It claimed responsibility for a dawn raid on a major police station in the Nigerian capital last year, where it said hundreds of prisoners were released. Last month, it attacked a convoy of Nigerian troops en route to deployment in Mali.

The group said the abduction of the Frenchman last year was motivated by France’s ban of the full-face veil and its military intervention against Islamist insurgents in Mali.

Kidnapping of foreigners for ransom has been common in Nigeria’s southern oil region for years but abductions by radical Islamists in the north began only last year.

Britain in November put Ansaru on its official "terrorist group" list, saying it was aligned with al-Qaeda and was behind the kidnap of a British and a Italian killed last year during a failed rescue attempt.

Ansaru is thought to have loose ties to Boko Haram, which has killed hundreds during a three-year-long insurgency focused mostly on Nigerian security forces, religious targets and politicians, rather than foreigners.

Boko Haram wants to carve out an Islamic state in a country of 160-million split roughly equally between Christians and Muslims. It poses the biggest threat to stability in Africa’s top oil-producing state.

President Goodluck Jonathan has repeatedly said that the military are winning the battle against what he calls "terrorism" in northern Nigeria.

But Western governments are increasingly concerned about Islamists in Nigeria linking up with groups outside the region, including al-Qaeda’s North African wing AQIM.

Reuters