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One monument cannot capture all country’s ills

Is there one effigy that seizes the slow pace of progress? Of course there is … dump excrement on that carbuncle, Medupi, writes Simon Lincoln Reader

THE INSIDER: Is this the number two source of gold?

Picture: THINKSTOCK

How this gold got into human waste in the first place ought to be a subject of study on its own

Uproar at UCT has only been good for it

Anthony Butler promo

National Heritage Resources Act characterises public monuments as part of the national estate and as protected by law, writes Anthony Butler

THE INSIDER: Don’t tell fans of colonial monuments

SA’s Imran Tahir covers his face with his cap next to his teammates after they lost their Cricket World Cup semifinal match against New Zealand in Auckland on Tuesday. Picture: REUTERS

The pee-back project will not affect South African wall urinators

THICK END OF THE WEDGE: Want more black Proteas? Try this...

Peter Bruce promo

The only way to make sure there is a pool of budding Ntinis to replace an injured Philander one day is to start building a new class of rural boarding schools throughout SA now, writes Peter Bruce

STREET DOGS: Invention and implementation

Sometimes you need a visionary to figure out what to do with a discovery, writes Michel Pireu

Of mangoes, or not waiting for fruit of fraud to fall

President Zuma’s proactive approach to 'harvesting mangoes' gathers a following, writes Natasha Marrian

TWEET OF THE WEEK: The DA’s McBride muddle

Looking for logic and consistency in ANC appointments these days, even by the party’s own autocratic and anticonstitutional standards, is a futile exercise, writes Gareth van Onselen


Previous columns


Development at the cost of rights

By lauding the success of these developmental states, we are in effect saying the end justifies the means, writes Bronwyn Nortje

STREET DOGS: An honest appraisal

Michel Pireu: ‘It is time for serious questions about the unusual market, distortions and excessive valuations’

AT HOME AND ABROAD: State must hold the line on the slippery slope to unrest

Allister Sparks masthead

A harsh winter of discontent lies ahead as trade unions and the state parley, writes Allister Sparks

Can coach Shakes hold steady as Bafana’s poisoned chalice takes effect?

Mninawa Ntloko promo

These are desperate times and Ephraim 'Shakes' Mashaba now finds himself under the cosh from the cynics, writes Mninawa Ntloko

SA pays price of Eskom’s disastrous governance

The governance of state-owned enterprises, while more complex, is just as important as in private enterprises — if not more so, writes Hilary Joffe

Students shining the spotlight on an untruth

Coloniser Rhodes had the foresight to carefully construct a new legacy for himself, writes Zama Ndlovu

VRROOM WITH A VIEW: Hard to explain away the racist Rhodes was

However deeply imperfect and catastrophically flawed, Cecil John Rhodes created SA, writes Alex Parker

Market remains a devilish thing

Michel Pireu looks at some common market delusions

THE INSIDER: Sometimes the name can say it all …

Collins Chabane. Picture: BRIAN WITBOOI.

Some people are born to their profession, yet often it is not a calling but an eponymous coincidence

Pragmatist or Fearist, transform SA we shall

Nomalanga Mkhize

Nomalanga Mkhize highlights five leadership tendencies in the politics of transformation

The stink is not about just one statue, it is about tolerance

The Cecil Rhodes statue must stay, despite the demands of student ‘Taliban’, writes John-Kane Berman

STRAIGHT TALK: Pass, create the gaps and score

Mark Barnes promo

It would help if we had less country-specific risk built into our currency so we wouldn’t need to keep juicing up the yield, writes Mark Barnes

Time for Du Plessis to turn his frown upside down

Bismarck du Plessis. Picture: GALLO IMAGES/STEVE HAAG

For the past two seasons Bismarck du Plessis has played as if the game is a grind when it should only ever be among the grandest of jobs, writes Mark Keohane

ON THE WATER: No amount of faeces can rewrite history

The statue of Cecil John Rhodes  covered with plastic at the UCT main campus in Cape Town. Picture: ADRIAN DE KOCK

Protesting students have no right to change the choice of history future generations of students may hope to discover at UCT, writes Neels Blom

Zille, bullies, Zuma and chess

SA’s leading politicians reveal their underbellies through social media and on how to play a calculated, cunning and strategic game without losing one’s head, writes Gareth van Onselen

SIGN POST: Ostriches make it big on the Internet of Things

The problem with the Internet of Things is that the internet connectivity is now so commonplace that it is taken completely for granted, writes Arthur Goldstuck

Less testosterone could make for much better banks

Picture: THINKSTOCK

While the most powerful posts in the financial world are held by women, senior jobs in private-sector finance are taken almost exclusively by men, writes John Kay

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON: Agoa hostage to party political manoeuvring

Picture: THINKSTOCK

Good news is that US companies are lobbying hard for SA’s continued inclusion in African Growth and Opportunity Act, writes Simon Barber

Embrace competing narratives of history

Multilingualism at learning institutions would be an interesting and challenging step in the right direction, writes Anton Harber

Saru old boys club must join modern world to level the field

There is no trade-off between competitiveness and transformation — look at Western Province, writes Liz McGregor

THE INSIDER: Postal oversight could benefit errant motorists

Picture: DAILY DISPATCH

Incorrectly sent traffic fine notices can safely be ignored

STREET DOGS: Sticking to value investing

The late Irving Kahn recommended private investors tune out the prevailing views they hear on the radio, television and the internet

Politics in SA marches to flags and not left-right

Labels 'left' and 'right' are inadequate to describe fellow South Africans, writes Steven Friedman

Eskom is victim of bad policies and absurd expectations

Leon Louw promo

Eskom problem is consequence of devotion to ‘strategic’ apartheid enterprises, not presence or absence of war rooms, turnaround plans, writes Leon Louw

Cash does not make a better matric

Phakamisa Ndzamela: What are people buying from expensive schools if children in townships are also getting distinctions?

De Villiers and McCullum … dynamic captains cut from a similar cloth

AB De Villiers. Picture: AFP PHOTO/MICHAEL BRADLEY

Statistics and data play a valuable role, while some, like De Villiers, prefer to trust their ‘gut instinct’, writes Neil Manthorp

LETTER FROM NAIROBI: Rape victims need justice, not ‘sound advice’

Many societies prefer the idea of rape prevention as a concept that victims should adhere to as opposed to one in which the rapists should be held accountable, writes Muthoni Maingi

STREET DOGS: Finding order in the chaos

Investment pundits often thrive by dispensing conspicuously contradictory maxims, writes Michel Pireu

Eskom is a sign of decay of our democracy

If an inability to keep the lights on is a yardstick, then the future of the entire democratic project may be in doubt, writes Songezo Zibi

Debate over Rhodes is one of transformation

The removal of the Rhodes statue appears to be a metaphorical call for the transformation of the university’s curriculum, culture and faculty, writes Adekeye Adebajo

ON THE MONEY: Sassa tender bungle benefits CPS

Stuart Theobald promo

The Reserve Bank and National Treasury have a bit of a pickle on their hands, writes Stuart Theobald

ON WORK: Motherhood can be extremely hard work but it is not a job

Lucy Kellaway promo

At home in extremis I can shout and throw things; if I did that at work I would probably get fired, writes Lucy Kellaway

Open up networks for cheaper mobile data

Duncan McLeod: Service providers’ body believes the same model for bringing down the cost of fixed-line broadband can be applied in mobile

THE LAST WORD: Why all the stalling on the Steinhoff share deals?

Rob Rose: Surely the Financial Services Board has found enough evidence to either launch a formal probe or to say Steinhoff’s bosses are off the hook?

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