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SA must be driven by an industrialist mastermind

SA needs a visionary engineer-businessman hybrid to forge a black industrialist class, writes Phakamisa Ndzamela

THE INSIDER: Presidency tries to give chopper rumours chop

President Jacob Zuma addresses ANC supporters on Saturday at the Cape Town Stadium for the ruling party’s 103rd anniversary celebrations.  Picture: TREVOR SAMSON

Before you know it old JZ will be accused of using a government canoe for family outings at the Nkandla swimming pool

STREET DOGS: Pathetic fallacies abound

Don’t be swayed by sentiment or anthropomorphisms — especially when it comes to the market, writes Michel Pireu

LETTER FROM LONDON: Pulling down statues doesn’t help build the future

I doubt whether a statue of Cecil John Rhodes at a university represents a clear and present danger to the future of the republic, writes Marvin Meintjies

Society expects CEOs to be circumspect

Trudi Makhaya examines how society prefers its business leaders to act a bit like beauty queens

Highs and lows in hindsight

After 12 years of Street Dogs, the same remains true: Finding good companies and holding those positions tenaciously can yield multiples, writes Michel Pireu

VRROOM WITH A VIEW: Top Gear affair more about elite’s need to impose itself

When Jeremy Clarkson lost his cool at the end of a long day my instinct is to condemn in the strongest terms his awful behaviour, but to sympathise with the exhaustion and frustration, writes Alexander Parker

Selection controversy is occupational hazard for Proteas captain

AB de Villiers. Picture: GALLO IMAGES/JOHAN RYNNERS

Most captains make no effort to keep contentious selection a secret, writes Neil Manthorp


Previous columns


ON THE MONEY: The perils of information overload

Stuart Theobald promo

Inflicting the vast amount of data onto consumers as a legislated requirement is likely to damage social outcomes, writes Stuart Theobald

SA Super Rugby teams’ lack of consistency raises questions

Lions player Julian Redelinghuys (bottom centre) reacts at the bottom of a driving maul during the Super 15 rugby match between Queensland Reds and South Africa's Lions at Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane on March 27. Picture: AFP PHOTO/PATRICK HAMILTON

The Lions have won the hearts of many because they refuse to surrender, writes Mark Keohane

Dreams of an energy bonanza may be stillborn

Gavin Keeton

We don’t know if there is any gas or oil to develop. Expensive exploration must first be undertaken to establish whether resources even exist, writes Gavin Keeton

ON THE WATER: Foreigners are not the problem, Sire

King Goodwill Zwelithini. Picture: SUPPLIED

Foreigners working in SA increase the demand for labour rather than taking our jobs, writes Neels Blom

SIGN POST: How Eskom is making data centres appealing

Arthur Goldstuck: Because guaranteed ‘uptime’ is one of the key selling features of data centres, they have been given fresh impetus by Eskom’s mismanagement of the power grid

RANTS & SENSE: Down the rabbit hole in Eskom’s Blunderland

Koeberg nuclear power station at sunset.

Eskom is going to price itself out of the market, and it will be those who can least afford to pay its prices who will suffer or find illegal means of tapping into the grid, writes Bruce Whitfield

THE LAST WORD: Breaking news: we need ‘old-school’ reporting

In a few weeks, business website Moneyweb will clash with Naspers’s Media24 in the high court in a case with serious implications for the business of news, writes Rob Rose

One monument cannot capture all country’s ills

Is there one effigy that seizes the slow pace of progress? Of course there is … dump excrement on that carbuncle, Medupi, writes Simon Lincoln Reader

THE INSIDER: Is this the number two source of gold?

Picture: THINKSTOCK

How this gold got into human waste in the first place ought to be a subject of study on its own

Uproar at UCT has only been good for it

Anthony Butler promo

National Heritage Resources Act characterises public monuments as part of the national estate and as protected by law, writes Anthony Butler

THE INSIDER: Don’t tell fans of colonial monuments

SA’s Imran Tahir covers his face with his cap next to his teammates after they lost their Cricket World Cup semifinal match against New Zealand in Auckland on Tuesday. Picture: REUTERS

The pee-back project will not affect South African wall urinators

Development at the cost of rights

By lauding the success of these developmental states, we are in effect saying the end justifies the means, writes Bronwyn Nortje

STREET DOGS: An honest appraisal

Michel Pireu: ‘It is time for serious questions about the unusual market, distortions and excessive valuations’

AT HOME AND ABROAD: State must hold the line on the slippery slope to unrest

Allister Sparks masthead

A harsh winter of discontent lies ahead as trade unions and the state parley, writes Allister Sparks

Can coach Shakes hold steady as Bafana’s poisoned chalice takes effect?

Mninawa Ntloko promo

These are desperate times and Ephraim 'Shakes' Mashaba now finds himself under the cosh from the cynics, writes Mninawa Ntloko

SA pays price of Eskom’s disastrous governance

The governance of state-owned enterprises, while more complex, is just as important as in private enterprises — if not more so, writes Hilary Joffe

Students shining the spotlight on an untruth

Coloniser Rhodes had the foresight to carefully construct a new legacy for himself, writes Zama Ndlovu

VRROOM WITH A VIEW: Hard to explain away the racist Rhodes was

However deeply imperfect and catastrophically flawed, Cecil John Rhodes created SA, writes Alex Parker

Market remains a devilish thing

Michel Pireu looks at some common market delusions

THE INSIDER: Sometimes the name can say it all …

Collins Chabane. Picture: BRIAN WITBOOI.

Some people are born to their profession, yet often it is not a calling but an eponymous coincidence

Pragmatist or Fearist, transform SA we shall

Nomalanga Mkhize

Nomalanga Mkhize highlights five leadership tendencies in the politics of transformation

UNEMBARGOED: Let’s not selectively preserve memory

Discussion about UCT Rhodes statue has great potential to expand to other memorials and monuments black South Africans find offensive, writes Songezo Zibi

SA works, but that is not enough to attract investors anymore

Dianna Games promo

Political complacency and stagnating economic growth have served to highlight, inadvertently, what competitors north of the border are offering, writes Dianna Games

ON WORK: Your rudeness in reception could be used against you

Lucy Kellaway promo

How people arrive at and leave an office building provides rewarding insights for companies, writes Lucy Kellaway

STRAIGHT TALK: Europe fails on teamwork

Mark Barnes promo

Our infrastructure decay is at once a backlog and an opportunity to create jobs, writes Mark Barnes

Expect fireworks when WhatsApp allows calls

The reason the rest of the mobile industry is so concerned about WhatsApp is its vast subscriber base of more than 700-million users, writes Duncan McLeod

THE CHATTER: Why Warren Buffett is bad for your health

A Heinz Ketchup bottle sits between a box of Kraft macaroni and cheese and a bottle of Kraft Original Barbecue Sauce. Picture: REUTERS

The Oracle of Omaha has made a mint on artery-based arbitrage, writes Kyle Stock

THICK END OF THE WEDGE: Want more black Proteas? Try this...

Peter Bruce promo

The only way to make sure there is a pool of budding Ntinis to replace an injured Philander one day is to start building a new class of rural boarding schools throughout SA now, writes Peter Bruce

STREET DOGS: Invention and implementation

Sometimes you need a visionary to figure out what to do with a discovery, writes Michel Pireu

Of mangoes, or not waiting for fruit of fraud to fall

President Zuma’s proactive approach to 'harvesting mangoes' gathers a following, writes Natasha Marrian

TWEET OF THE WEEK: The DA’s McBride muddle

Looking for logic and consistency in ANC appointments these days, even by the party’s own autocratic and anticonstitutional standards, is a futile exercise, writes Gareth van Onselen

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON: Agoa hostage to party political manoeuvring

Picture: THINKSTOCK

Good news is that US companies are lobbying hard for SA’s continued inclusion in African Growth and Opportunity Act, writes Simon Barber

Embrace competing narratives of history

Multilingualism at learning institutions would be an interesting and challenging step in the right direction, writes Anton Harber

Saru old boys club must join modern world to level the field

There is no trade-off between competitiveness and transformation — look at Western Province, writes Liz McGregor

THE INSIDER: Postal oversight could benefit errant motorists

Picture: DAILY DISPATCH

Incorrectly sent traffic fine notices can safely be ignored

STREET DOGS: Sticking to value investing

The late Irving Kahn recommended private investors tune out the prevailing views they hear on the radio, television and the internet

Politics in SA marches to flags and not left-right

Labels 'left' and 'right' are inadequate to describe fellow South Africans, writes Steven Friedman

Eskom is victim of bad policies and absurd expectations

Leon Louw promo

Eskom problem is consequence of devotion to ‘strategic’ apartheid enterprises, not presence or absence of war rooms, turnaround plans, writes Leon Louw

Cash does not make a better matric

Phakamisa Ndzamela: What are people buying from expensive schools if children in townships are also getting distinctions?

De Villiers and McCullum … dynamic captains cut from a similar cloth

AB De Villiers. Picture: AFP PHOTO/MICHAEL BRADLEY

Statistics and data play a valuable role, while some, like De Villiers, prefer to trust their ‘gut instinct’, writes Neil Manthorp

LETTER FROM NAIROBI: Rape victims need justice, not ‘sound advice’

Many societies prefer the idea of rape prevention as a concept that victims should adhere to as opposed to one in which the rapists should be held accountable, writes Muthoni Maingi

Eskom is a sign of decay of our democracy

If an inability to keep the lights on is a yardstick, then the future of the entire democratic project may be in doubt, writes Songezo Zibi

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