Chairman of the uMkhonto weSizwe Military Veterans Association Kebby Maphatsoe, right, briefs media on the formation of a new political party at Luthili House on Tuesday. Picture: PUXLEY MAKGATHO
Chairman of the uMkhonto weSizwe Military Veterans Association Kebby Maphatsoe, right, briefs media on the formation of a new political party at Luthili House in April. Picture: PUXLEY MAKGATHO

THE launch of new political parties such as Agang and South Africa First are signs of foreign agents trying to destabilise the country, said the chairman of the uMkhonto weSizwe Military Veterans Association (MKMVA), Kebby Maphatsoe, on Tuesday.

Mr Maphatsoe was speaking to journalist gathered at Luthuli Houseafter the rweekend launch of SA First — a new political party that has been linked to former members of the MK ranks.

Mr Maphatsoe launched a scathing attack on the co-founder of the new political party Eddie Mokhoanatse, saying he and fellow SA First members were counter-revolutionary.

"We never had a split in the MKMVA and we never will. We only have disgruntled individuals who were expelled because of ill-discipline. These agents want to reverse the gains of this liberation movement.

"It is important to note that Eddie Mokhoanatse, deserted the ANC in the eighties. While he was deployed in the German Democratic Republic, he skipped to the Federal Republic of Germany attracted by the shine of good life and bright life, while the rest of the comrades stood firm in their posts," he said.

Deputy chair of the MKMVA Teenage Monama said what these expelled members were doing was what he would categorise as "a new tendency".

"They have their own counter-revolutionary intentions and ultimately their goal is to weaken the ANC. As the once leaders of this glorious organisation Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo said, the only elephant that will destroy the ANC is the ANC itself. We will never allow anyone to destroy the ANC as long as Tata is alive," he said.

At the weekend launch, Mr Mokhoantse said opposition parties had failed to deliver a credible alternative to the ANC and he believed that their new party had the ability to succeed.

"In 2009 only 59% of South Africans eligible to vote did vote. That leaves about 41%, a good 12-million South Africans who did not want to have anything to do with elections.

"We need to understand why. It could be voter apathy or distrust. We want to say to them if you not going to stand up and do something about this country; we are going to lose it," said Mr Mokhoanatse.

Mr Maphatsoe said it was the wider strategy of the Democratic Alliance and the international monopoly capital to use 'agent provacateurs' such as SA First to rewrite the history of South Africa’s liberation struggle.

"Today they want to parade with fake credentials to betray the cause of the struggles of our people. If you continue with those tendencies of being counter-revolutionary; we are quick to remember you," he said.